On Writing, Tech, and Other Loquacities

The collected works of Lana Brindley: writer, speaker, blogger


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Sssh! Sneak Preview!

Don’t tell anyone I told you, but here’s my slide deck for the presentation I’m giving in Cincinnati this weekend at the Open Help Conference

Not sure if there’ll be recording on the day or not, but I’ll get some more details up here afterwards, either in the form of video or an article.

See you soon, America!

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Open Source Developer’s Conference 2011 – Call for Papers!

The Open Source Developer’s Conference (OSDC to its friends) is being held in Canberra in November this year, which is a little bit exciting, and they have just opened their call for papers.

Also this year, for the first time, they’re asking for miniconf proposals too. I would love to do a whole miniconf on open source documentation, but I’m not sure I have that kind of stamina. Of course, If you’re interested in helping me out, let me know!

I spoke at OSDC last year, when it was in Melbourne, and the footage is on my videos page. I thoroughly enjoyed the experience, so it will be interesting to see what kind of event Canberra can put on this year.

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Taking a Walk on the Open Side

Tonight, I gave a talk about Open Source for the Canberra Society of Editors (who invite the ACT branch of the Society of Technical Communicators, of which I am a member). There was a reasonable crowd, who all seemed interested and who asked lots of questions. It is always satisfying to give a talk and to see a light go on in people’s eyes, see that spark of something flash in their faces as they learn something new, think about something in a different way, or experience a different perspective. That, my friends, is what makes it all worth it.

This talk wasn’t recorded, unfortunately, so I won’t be providing video, but I can tempt you with my slide deck. Unfortunately, my slide decks don’t tend to have many words on them, so you might not learn much, but there are lots of pretty pictures. And if you were present at the discussion tonight, thanks for coming, and I hope you found some inspiration. Please feel free to drop a note in the comments if you’re after more information about anything.

If you do want to know more, there is a fairly severely shortened version of it in this month’s edition of Words. I’ll put the full text of that up here in the next few days, or you could head over to their website and check it out there.

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Society of Editors Playing in the Grass

Some time ago, I gave a web seminar for the Society of Technical Communicators (STC) in the US, which was an interesting experience. Considering it occurred at 4am local time, I’m not entirely certain I was at my best, but luckily I’ve been given the opportunity to repeat the talk at a more reasonable time. The Canberra Society of Editors also welcomes the ACT branch of the Australian Society of Technical Communicators (ASTC) to their meetings every month, and through this happy alliance, I will be presenting The Grass is Greener on the Open Side on 27 April at 6:30pm, at the Australian National University.

I’m constantly surprised with how closed the technical communicator’s world can be. In an industry where Adobe and Madcap rule the roost, if you mention that you work in open source, or use open source tools, people tend to nod mutely. Either they have no idea what ‘open source’ actually is, or they have no idea what working with open source tools might actually entail. And so this talk was born. It is intended to be treated as Open Source 101 for technical communicators, essentially.

And of course, if you can make it along, I’d love to see you!

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Louisa Lawson and The Digitise The Dawn Project

Louisa Albury was born in 1848 in Mudgee, the second of twelve children. Although she was offered a position as ‘pupil teacher’ at school, she was encouraged by her parents to leave school in order to look after her younger siblings. It was a fairly common thing to happen to eldest girls at the time, but judging by Louisa’s later life, it seems that she regretted it most severely. And who can blame her? She married Niels Hertzberg Larsen (who called himself Peter) in 1866 at the tender age of eighteen, and they later Anglicised their surname to Lawson. Peter, for good or bad, spent much of his time away at the goldfields, and left Louisa at home to look after their brood of five children alone. Eventually, his absences became longer and more frequent, and by the time Louisa moved with her children to Sydney in 1883, the marriage was all but over. Left alone with five children to support, and with very little and sporadic financial assistance from Peter, she turned her hand first to sewing and washing to earn money. She also took in boarders from time to time. In 1887, she took the opportunity to purchase The Republican newspaper, a paper about which I’ve been almost completely unable to find information on, sadly. The one thing I have learned, though, is that it (apparently) “called for all Australians to unite under ‘the flag of a Federated Australia, the Great Republic of the Southern Seas'”[0]. By all accounts, it didn’t last long though, and ceased production the following year, in 1888. But Louisa’a political leanings were very much beginning to show.

Apparently bitten by the publishing bug, and probably eager to continue publishing her own essays and works of poetry, she started publishing a magazine called The Dawn in 1888. It was printed as “A Journal for Australian Women” and “publicize women’s wrongs, fight their battles and sue for their suffrage”[1]. It was the first newspaper printed in Australia that dealt with issues of feminism and suffrage, and is considered perhaps the single most important factor in the beginning of the suffragette movement in Australia. Shortly after The Dawn‘s inception, Louisa’s husband Peter died, leaving her with a large inheritance, which was immediately spent on improving the printing press and increasing the circulation of the magazine. She also hired ten staff, all of whom were women. The NSW Typographical Association did not accept female members at the time, and took exception to the fact that a magazine could be edited, printed, and circulated only by women. They took up arms against Louisa and the magazine and encouraged advertisers to boycott The Dawn and reportedly harassed the women on site.

As evidence of Louisa’s strength, she did not let this discourage her, and in 1889, she began running meetings at the Dawn offices which became known as The Dawn Club. The Club discussed issues relating to the “evil laws” made by men, and encouraged women to infiltrate male-dominated arenas such as debating clubs, and Louisa herself became the first female member of the board of management of the Sydney Mechanics’ School of Arts.
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The Womanhood Suffrage League of NSW began in 1891 and, hardly surprisingly, Louisa was elected to its council. She offered the Dawn offices and printing press for the League to use for meetings and pamphlets free of charge, and this remained the case until the League’s demise, despite the fact that Louisa herself withdrew from the council in 1893 after an ill-documented dispute.
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By the time women were given the vote in 1902, Louisa was starting to slow down. In 1900, she had a fall from a tram and was badly injured, although she was politically active again in 1902 itself, when she was introduced to the Australia parliament as “The Mother of Suffrage in New South Wales”[2]. During the early 1900’s she took several extended ‘rest’ periods from her campaigning and the magazine. She was 54, not old by our modern standards, but perfectly elderly by the standards of the day, and she had worked hard both physically and mentally all her life.

With the coming of the women’s vote, Louisa aged and so, sadly, did The Dawn. The columns grew fewer and less fervent, the advertisers gradually departed, and in 1905 the newspaper printed its last edition.

Louisa continued to write for several Sydney-based publications, and she also produced an extensive volume of poetry.

I have been unable to find out what mental ailment troubled her in her final days, but dementia appears to be the most likely. She died in the Gladesville Mental Hospital aged 72, in 1920. The fight gets to even the strongest of us in the end.

Unfortunately, The Dawn has so far not been included in the National Library’s ‘Trove’ Digitisation Project, despite it’s great historical significance in gaining Australian women the vote, and despite Louisa’s passion and fervour in promoting women’s rights of all description. Do you feel it’s an important part of Australian history? If you do, why not contribute to the project? It’s being run by the lovely Donna Benjamin and she needs your help to raise the funds to make the digitisation a reality. You might also like to follow @digitisethedawn on Twitter to keep up with progress, and to help spread the word.
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Oh, and as a postscript: yes, Louisa did have a very famous son, but her story is so much more interesting than that, don’t you agree?

[0] http://www.nla.gov.au/guides/federation/people/lawsonl.html

[1] http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/biogs/A100019b.htm

[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisa_Lawson

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FOSS Training

I was privileged enough to be able to attend linux.conf.au in Wellington in January. While there, I caught Bob Edwards’ and Andrew Tridgell’s talk on “Teaching FOSS at Universities” (video of which can be found here). It intrigued me.

Open source software development is very different to developing software in a more traditional, closed source environment. The aim of the course is to teach students how to go about working within the open source community. It covers the practical aspects of checking out code from a repository, submitting patches, and undergoing code approvals and reviews. It also looks at some of the less tangible aspects, like what’s accepted and expected within the community, the motivation behind project development, and governance. The course also goes into some detail about documentation.

Documentation for open source projects is not quite the known quantity that it can be in many proprietary software environments. I once had a developer I was working with describe it as “we live in the Wild West out here”, and – at least to an extent – he makes a good point. While writing for an open source project may not be as wild and exciting as that sentence makes it sound, it can sometimes be unpredictable and, at times, incredibly frustrating. Frequently, a book has been written and reviewed in preparation for a release, only to find at the last minute that a feature has been pulled from the version, a component has suddenly been renamed, or the graphical interface has had some kind of redesign. All of these things happen to open source writers on a regular basis, and frequently the only solution is to pull an all-nighter, get the changes in, and have the document released on schedule. And that’s only if you were lucky enough to find out about the change with enough time to spare before release!

So how does a writer plan for and write a documentation suite when there’s so much unknown in a project? The answer is – perhaps ironically – to plan ahead. You can’t plan for every contingency, nor should you. But if you have a plan of any description, you’re going to be better off when things start to go wrong. Pin down the details as best you can as far ahead as possible. But don’t leave it there, continue to review and adapt your plan. Keep your ear to the ground, and constantly tweak your schedule and your book to suit. If something comes up in a mailing list about a feature you’ve never heard of, don’t be afraid to ask the question – “Does this need to be documented? Will it be in the next version? Where can I get more source information?”. Another trick is to make sure you build in ‘wiggle room’ to your schedule, in case you suddenly discover a new chapter that needs adding, or a whole section that needs to be changed. If you’re consistently a few days or a week ahead of schedule, then even a substantial change should not throw you too far off balance.

Just like a ballet dancer, technical writers need to be disciplined, structured, and organised. But you also need to have grace, poise, tact, and – most importantly – flexibility.

Thanks to Bob and Tridge, I’ll be lecturing the 2010 FOSS course students at the Australian National University later this week. I’ll also be contributing the textbook that is being developed for the course. True to form, it is being built by and for the open source community, using open source tools (including Publican which has been developed in-house by some of my esteemed colleagues). Watch this space for more information.

Cross-posted to FOSS Docs
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