On Writing, Tech, and Other Loquacities

The collected works of Lana Brindley: writer, speaker, blogger

OpenStack Newton Summit – Docs Wrapup

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Everything is bigger in Texas: including the conferences!

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This Summit was a homecoming of sorts. OpenStack started in Austin with 750 people, and returned six years and twelve conferences later with 7500 people. Even the baristas in the downtown coffee shops noticed us the second time around.

For documentation, this conference was bigger than usual as well. We had a total of eight sessions, in addition to the contributor meetup on the last day, which is more docs sessions than we have ever had before.

And we had a lot to talk about! The biggest thing on our minds was the future of the OpenStack Installation Guide. The Big Tent has changed the way that projects go about joining the OpenStack ecosystem, and with Foundation having an increased focus on ensuring new projects have sufficient documentation, we needed to change our approach to documenting the installation of an OpenStack cloud. There is no ‘right’ way to install a cloud any more, and there is certainly no ‘right’ set of components you should be installing when you do it. But with a small documentation team, and a seemingly endless parade of new components requiring documentation, we were faced with a big technical challenge, where everyone had some kind of skin in the game. Despite some differences of opinion, the session itself was extremely productive, and we came away with a solid set of deliverables for Newton. First of all, we’re going to create the infrastructure to allow projects to write their own installation docs in their repos, and then publish them seamlessly to the docs.openstack.org front page. This means that projects have responsibility for their own docs, but the docs team will provide assistance in the form of templates and infrastructure support to ensure that all projects are treated as first class citizens. Secondly, the existing Installation Guide will change focus to be more about an installation tutorial, giving people a highly opinionated and completely manual installation method to learn the ropes, but not to install a production cloud. Thanks to the OpenStack User Survey, we can safely say that most production clouds are installed using some kind of automated tool, so having manual installation instructions is useful as a training tool, but not in a real world scenario.

With the big question more or less settled, we got on to the fairly long laundry list of other things that needed to be done, which all ended up focusing mostly on streamlining some of our processes, being clearer about the way we operate, consolidating guides that had (for obscure historical reasons) been in their own repos into the main one again, and general editing and tidying up. A full list of the goals can be seen here: Newton Docs Deliverables. And, for historical interest, here’s the whiteboard from the Summit session:

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During the Mitaka release, docs had a focus on Manageability, aiming to work more effectively and efficiently, with a focus on collaboration. For Newton, while manageability themes are still very much present, the focus is more on Scalability, and making our documentation efforts scale out to represent a much greater proportion of products, contributors, operators, and users. From empowering projects to write their own documentation with our support, to making our processes simpler to find and understand, to ensuring our documentation is as accurate, up-to-date, and effective as possible, it’s going to be an exciting cycle for docs!

I leave you with one of my favourite Texan big things: a bathtub margarita!

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